My Favourite Properties

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Buying In Ayrshire

Historically

The county of Ayrshire is situated to the South West of Scotland and covers over 11,000 sq miles and a population of around 400,000. The main industries which fuelled the local economy over the years were agriculture, mining, fishing and tourism.

The decline of the mining industry since the 1980s has taken its toll on areas which grew up to support that industry. Traditional mining areas in particular in East and South Ayrshire which have limited employment opportunities have lagged behind of the larger towns with their more diverse economies.

In North Ayrshire, also, the lack of local manufacturing and employment has had an effect on their economies.

Most towns have a number of areas which were built by the local authorities(council houses) to accommodate the rise in population since WW2 and in these areas, many tenants have taken their right to buy so many of these properties and are now in private ownership.

Each town has its “Council Estate” which is a mix of owner occupier, private tenants and council owned properties. In general these tend to be cheaper to buy on the open market than properties which have been built for the private ownership market.

In the 1960s, the Irvine Development Cooperation was set up to build the first of Scotland’s 5 new towns to be built round and incorporating three existing towns and oversaw large scale developments in Kilwinning, Irvine and Dreghorn. These properties are also of mixed ownership now.

The local authorities have had limited resources to build new “council houses” and the right to buy for existing local authority tenants has been discontinued in recent years leading to a shortage in rental properties.

Areas

In general, house prices in the South Ayrshire towns of Prestwick and Ayr, as well as Troon have recovered quicker than the rest of the county since the crash of 2007/08 enjoying more local employment. In North Ayrshire, the seaside towns of Largs, Seamill and West Kilbride, because of their sea views have had a slight advantage over the rest of the area.

In East Ayrshire, the most significant house building programmes are in and around Kilmarnock with its ease of access for commuting to Glasgow.

Glasgow Prestwick International Airport enjoys a central position in the Shire and Glasgow’s other International Airport is less than an hour’s drive for most of the population of the county.

The rolling fields that make up the landscape are home to hundreds of rural properties of all kinds, and some with great views of the sea and the Isle of Arran. The Island itself is home to a great market in holiday homes and offers superb landscapes, views and outdoor activities possibilities.

Prices

House prices vary as much as the type of accommodation. If you are unsure, there are many places to research online, and I recommend visiting a few local Estate Agents who have fantastic local knowledge.

One of the appeals of Ayrshire is that accommodation is so varied and many buyers from Glasgow have made a compromise with the cost and inconvenience of the daily commute and the affordability and general environment offered by living in Ayrshire.

Contact us to be added to our database and be notified of Ayrshire properties as they become available.

Properties

Most towns have a number of areas which were built by the local authorities (Council Houses)to accommodate the rise in population since WW2 and in these areas, many tenants have taken their right to buy so many of these properties are now in private ownership.

Each town has its “Council Estates” which are a mix of owner occupier, private tenants and council owned properties. In general these tend to be cheaper to buy on the open market than properties which have been built for the private ownership market.

In the 1960s, Irvine Development Cooperation was set up to build the first of Scotland’s 5 New Towns to be built around and incorporating three existing towns and oversaw large scale developments in Kilwinning, Irvine and Dreghorn. These properties are also of mixed ownership now. These in turn led to a large migration South from Glasgow and boosted the populations in Ayrshire.

The local authorities have had limited resources to build new “ council houses” and the right to buy for existing local authority tenants has been discontinued in recent years due to a shortage in local authority properties. There is therefore a strong private rental market in most areas as a result.

  • proof's in the pudding

    Completely over the moon with the time and effort Kevin has put into the sale of our house. Only 3 weeks on the market and several viewers before a firm offer was accepted. Remarkable at this time of year!! I would recommend anyone thinking of moving to give Kevin a call. It's been a pleasure:-)

    John McKinlay - Seller 2016

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